Wednesday, August 9, 2017

A dress to smell: Supersititious by Frederic Malle

It takes guts to come up with a new floral aldehyde in the time the category is reckoned extinct, first and majorly, because this genre is tightly related to memories of past and their era is, begrudgingly, over. Secondly floral aldehyde is a heady floral sparkling soapy category that for its link to past immediately reminds of oldness, muscular weakness and lack of health, which accordingly confront with repulse. Many of the genre are barely loved in public, specially among young generation. Last year Chanel accomplished to revive their legacy with new No5 l'Eau - luminous floral aldehyde - to adapt it to contemporary fashion. Another remarkable work is Dominique Ropion's newest launch for Frédéric Malle. This fragrance is interestingly named Superstitious and more interesting is this perfume is not a modification of an earlier stuff. It's totally new and it's crazy! Nevertheless, it does not face problems Chanel have simply because it is a first class niche tag whose audience scarcely seen in Sephora.

Monday, July 24, 2017

Terroni by Orto Parisi

Alessandro Gulatieri, the nose and artist behind Nasomatto, Orto Parisi and MariaLux lines of fragrances, updates his profile with a new incense-snipping fragrance for Orto Parisi named TerroniAs a non-Italian speaker this is a nice term to pronounce but the term is actually an offensive address to people of south Italian regions. While in urban slang, the term terroni (plural of terrone) seems to be a synonym of redneck in the US, the title is actually a reference to people who work with their hands in traditional methods and yield the earth and form roots of civilization without a shame of being rural or being engaged with farmyards. It is as real as Antonio Ricci in The Bicycle Thief and as lived and weary as portraits in Mario Giacomelli's camera.

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Walls of serenity: En Passant by Frederic Malle

I have been living in Ankara since 2010. A soulless city with concrete buildings and no nature nor water. But if you ask what in this city makes me excited the most I immediately reply scent of lilacs bushes in May. Hanging violet clusters of tiny flower form canopies on tip of their fragile stems. A heavy spring rain gives its scent a dusky face and mixing with smell of soil after rain, lilacs depict a cute sweetness with gray-shaded render that I cannot pass by without breathing it all the way in. En Passant made in 2000 by maestro perfumery Olivia Giacobetti - I should kiss her nose one day - is a rare example of lilac smell in perfumery and also a rare example of post-rain soil. (Not exactly smell of petrichor)

Friday, July 7, 2017

Chic and luxury; part II: Lux by Mona di Orio

Some portraits of perfume art changed my path and my journey in olfactory realm. One of them is Mona di Orio, whose chiaroscuro play of light and darkness evokes my inner dark passenger. A nose who delivered melancholy, darkness, erotism and elegance at once in all her soulful creations. Although after artist's death the house's new policy changed the bottles, juice volume and even created new formulas, MdO is still an elusive artistic brand with greats timeless works. The perfume I'm obsessed to write about, Lux, is a member of Signature Collection delivered in 2006. Before I skip to the scent I should mention another portrait who impressed me is Luca Turin, whose avuncular reviews fascinated me, nevertheless, his thumbing down reviews on many of MdO's works and malice towards herself made me rather intrigued about her creations because happily I have tried them all before I know Turin, otherwise, you know how great his impact is!

Monday, June 19, 2017

From palaces with love: an overview on Parfum d'Empire

Parfum d'Empire is a French niche house of exquisite fragrances which have been established in 2003 by creative director and nose Marc-Antoine Corticchiato. The inspiration source behind creations of this house is ancient empires and olfactory attribution of each depending on their cultures and available materials in their territories, to emerge an illusion of the past's glamour. In this post I shortly review few of their feminine works.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Chic and luxury: La Belle Hélène by Parfums MDCI

Chic or luxurious, this is not the question, this is the obsession. Two infinite obsessions with definitions near to each other. For me, general speaking, chic is intellectual, arty, and profoundly weird without making incommodity. It better not to be quintessential and conventional, nor aspirational. Like Picasso or Pollock, or even Keith Haring. They are artistic, or at least they surely were at their own time before they hyped. Art is what thrills you, what disturbs your ordinary mood and makes you out of yourself to look to things in a different view. Shocks you. Chic is charming, like a different style of dressing, an exotic taste, an unfamiliar music.
Luxury, on the other hand, is settled, archetypal and related to comfort, wealth and dainty like saunter with high heels on!

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Culture has no boundaries: an overview on new works of Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

When we were younger, twenty years ago or so, a silly play with cousins we used to do, when gathered every weekend in grandpa's village house, was chewing crimson rose petals to paint our tongues red! I still remember tea-like metallic taste, fresh dramatic smell, and velvet-like surface of rose petals in my mouth. I clearly recorded the picture of those days, comfortable late-spring sunlight, first cicada chirps over a tall maple in nearby orange farm, juiciness of loquats and smell of grandma's chicken coop.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

An overview on feminine fragrances by Rancé 1795

© pierre de nishapurHistorically based in Grasse and today based in Milan, the French perfumery house of Rancé 1795 takes its roots back in early 17th century when the family was in scented gloves production and trade for aristocratic society of old France.

Monday, June 5, 2017

Portrait of a gentleman: Brioni Eau de Toilette


© pierre de nishapurDue to a notable growth in the last decades - regardless to cons and pros - the perfume industry is swelled in a colossal scale and categorized in tens of branches. Some simply called mainstreams or designers, aiming to produce ordinary stuff from inferior to middle quality to catch fish from mass marketing and department stores. Finding good quality from this class if finding gold in river; hard labor but possible and once found it's Kuh-i-Noor! Once a while happens to see legendary fragrances like Dior Fahrenheit, Chloé Love, or Chanel Coco Mademoiselle.
Niches, indies, naturals, mainstreams, on and on... the categories are endless and each targets its customers from distinct angle. In this crowded bazaar there's a minority - yet large enough to gather in a group - of couture or tailor houses - mostly Italians - who run a small business of perfume in limited amount and superior quality. Brioni is one of them.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

I hate roses and I'm not afraid to confess

© pierre de nishapurIt's time to confess, or whatever we call it. I need to declare - as I frequently mentioned here and there - I can't bear roses on me. I even hardly tolerate many roses on others, nevertheless, a fine rose, no matter disliked, is what deserves a decent olfactory discovery. As a fragrance reviewer I am stubborn enough to analyze many roses even if they give me fatal headache and in this post I briefly show how capable I am! I introduce the most brilliant rose fragrances dropped on my way by chance this last months. Anyhow, you bear in mind that my main motto is the more real rose is, the more I avoid!

Roses are one of the most influential materials of perfumery, one of the most ancient ones with centuries of background. They are also symbol of love, lust, romance, and in field of perfumery they are the first thing coming to mind after the term: floral. All these attributions make roses deserving coats of arms!